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Glossary C

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Campus
Site where an institution's teaching and administrative buildings and, in some cases, halls of residence are located.

Central advanced examination (ZOP)
Final examination in advanced German accepted by Goethe Institutes or language schools affiliated to the Goethe Institute. The ZOP is equivalent to the DSH examination and is accepted by German higher education institutions as evidence of language proficiency for direct admission.

Central intermediate examination (ZMP)
Final examination in intermediate German accepted by Goethe Institutes or language schools affiliated to the Goethe Institute.

Central student advice service
Organisation that exists in almost every institution, advising prospective students and current students on all issues relating to their studies, for example choice of subject, applications and enrolment, and problems during their course.

Certificate
see: Completion certificate

Chair
A chair is the regular position of a professor at a higher education institution. The chair relates to a particular subject area, which a professor and his/her assistant specialise in.

Chancellor
Administrative head of a German higher education institution.

Colloquy
Course in which teaching takes the form of a discussion dealing with specific academic problems, often used as preparation for examinations and with guest speakers.

Completion certificate
Also referred to as a "Schein". Certificate confirming successful attendance of a course. There are graded and ungraded completion certificates. The examination rules stipulate how many completion certificates are required before a student is entitled to take the intermediate and final examinations.

Compulsory placement
Work placement that is stipulated in the course and examination rules.

Conferral
Award of a doctorate based on a thesis and - depending on the institution - a subsequent public disputation (normally a defence of the thesis) or oral examination (viva voce).

Consecutive course
A consecutive course refers to continuing studying for a Masters degree immediately after obtaining a Bachelor degree. The total length of the two courses is 5 years.

Council
Highest decision-making body of a higher education institution, at some institutions also known as the Great Senate or Academic Congregation. Advises on fundamental issues, selects various committees and functionaries.

Course
General term for all teaching at an institution, including seminars, tutorials and lectures. A combination of a subject of study and a possible final assessment for that subject. Not all institutions offer every course with a full range of degrees. Prospective students and applicants therefore need to find out exactly what courses are offered by their chosen institution before applying.

Course rules
Rules for the structure and content of a course, which generally apply in conjunction with the examination rules.

Credit Points
Unit for assessing courses studied. In Europe, many institutions have adopted the Bologna Process and use the standardised ECTS points system for assessing and comparing courses studied. One point (credit point) corresponds to 20 hours of work: This includes teaching courses, placements, work at home (preparing material and following up). Credits are often used to rate courses studied in other countries. The number of credits can play an important role in determining what type of entrance entitlement an applicant is considered to have. Students only obtain credit points for a unit if they attend the unit lectures and, where applicable, if their attendance and completion of the unit is officially recorded in their 'record of study' (Ger. "Studienbuch" or "Studiennachweisheft")

Cum tempore (c.t.)
see: Academic quarter hour

Curriculum
Structured teaching plan for a course.

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